Alert NWS Huntsville: latest on Hurricane Nate | CullmanSense

Alert

NWS Huntsville: latest on Hurricane Nate

HUNTSVILLE - The latest from the National Weather Service in Huntsville: A Tropical Storm Watch remains in effect for the Cullman area through Sunday evening. Scattered showers and a few thunderstorms are expected to develop later this afternoon and continue into tonight. Locally heavy downpours and gusty winds are possible.

Hurricane Nate will make landfall late tonight along the central Gulf coast and then move northeastward. As it nears the Tennessee Valley Sunday morning, Nate will weaken to a tropical storm. Sustained winds of 30 to 35 mph may begin as early as 9 a.m. on Sunday and then continue through the afternoon hours. Wind gusts could reach into the 45 to 50 mph range. Additionally, locally heavy rainfall will be possible, with amounts of up to 3 inches possible. Conditions will improve across the area Sunday evening, as Nate pushes northeast of the area.

* WIND - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Equivalent Tropical Storm force wind - Peak Wind Forecast: 30-40 mph with gusts to 55 mph - Window for Tropical Storm force winds: Sunday morning until Sunday afternoon - CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Elevated - The wind threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - Emergency plans should include a reasonable threat for tropical storm force wind of 39 to 57 mph. - To be safe, prepare for the potential of limited wind impacts. Remaining efforts to secure properties should now be brought to completion. - Hazardous wind is possible. Failure to adequately shelter may result in serious injury. Move to safe shelter before the wind becomes hazardous. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - Damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about. - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over. - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on bridges and other elevated roadways. - Scattered power and communications outages.

* FLOODING RAIN - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 2-4 inches, with locally higher amounts - CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Elevated - The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - Emergency plans should include a reasonable threat for minor flooding where peak rainfall totals are near amounts conducive for localized flash flooding and rapid inundation. - To be safe, prepare for the potential of limited flooding rain impacts. - Localized flooding is possible. If flood related watches and warnings are issued, heed recommended actions. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Limited - Localized rainfall flooding may prompt a few evacuations. - Rivers and tributaries may quickly rise with swifter currents. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos, and ditches may become swollen and overflow in spots. - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief road and bridge closures.

* TORNADO - LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: - Situation is somewhat favorable for tornadoes - CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: Elevated - The tornado threat has remained nearly steady from the previous assessment. - When implementing emergency plans, include a reasonable threat for isolated tornadoes. - To be safe, prepare for the potential of limited tornado impacts. - Listen for tornado watches and warnings. Be ready to shelter quickly if a tornado approaches. - POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Little to None - The occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution of emergency plans during tropical events. - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power and communications disruptions. - Locations could realize roofs peeled off buildings, chimneys toppled, mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned, large tree tops and branches snapped off, shallow-rooted trees knocked over, moving vehicles blown off roads, and small boats pulled from moorings.

* FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.weather.gov/huntsville